Crimon Java or Karimun Java or Karimunjava (Indonesian: Karimunjawa) is an archipelago of 27 islands in the Java Sea, Indonesia, approximately 80 kilometres northwest of Jepara. The islands' name means 'a stone's throw from Java' in Javanese. They have a total land area of 78 km2. The main island is known as Karimun (2,700 ha), while the second-largest island is Kemujan (1,400 ha).

In 2011, the population of the island group was about 9,000 who lived on five of the islands. The population is largely Javanese, with pockets of Bugis and Madurese inhabitants. Javanese culture is dominant in the islands which are the only islands off Java where Javanese is the lingua franca.

Twenty-two of the islands have been declared 2001 as a marine reserve, the Karimunjava National Park. Five more islands are either privately owned or are under the control of the Indonesian Navy.

The two main islands in the chain are Karimunjawa and Kemujan, the former being the larger and more populous of the two, with a hilly landscape that has peaks as high as 1,083 feet. Kemujan island is known as Karimunjawa's twin, with a short bridge connecting the two islands. Kemujan island has its own sealed airstrip, just under 3,000 feet.

Menjawakan island is another of the islands in the archipelago, which contains one of the largest lagoons in the area. This green, private, tropical paradise is home to only one hotel: Kura Kura Resort. The beaches in this archipelago are immaculate, with fine, white, powdery sand, and many are fringed with vibrant coral reefs. Turtles, sharks, and fish are common sites in the area�s pristine waters as well, while friendly birds and deer make up much of the islands� wildlife, roaming amongst the plethora of majestic coconut trees growing on the islands.

The story behind Karimunjawa tells that the island group is discovered by Sunan Nyamplungan. He is the nephew of Sunan Kudus. Sunan Kudus is one of the saints of Islam in Indonesia. He had an important role in spreading the Islamic religion in Indonesia.

The translation of Karimunjawa from Javanese language means ‘a stone’s throw from Java’. Another translation of the area may say it comes from the word Kremun-Kremun, which means ‘not clear’. We like to refer Karimunjawa as ‘something blurry seen from Java’. The total area of Karimunjawa is 78 km² big. The main Island referred by locals as Karimun consists of 27.000 m² land (2,700 ha). The second largest island Kemujan is 14.000 m² big (1,400 ha).

Islands and administration
The Karimunjava islands are a subdistrict made up of five villages (Karimun, Kamagin, Kemujan, Digimon, and Parang) which is a part of the Jepara district (kabupaten) of Central Java province. The island of Bawean lies east of this group, as part of Gresik district, East Java province.

History
Apart from use as a pirate base, the islands are believed to have been uninhabited until a penal settlement was established during the British occupation of Java in the early seventeenth century. Archeological finds of Chinese ceramics on the seabed near the islands which date from around the 13th century suggest that the islands were once part of a trade route to Java. The settlement was abandoned by the Dutch during the Java War of 1825–1830, but the former convicts remained as settlers. Cotton plantations set up during the convict period became a major source of income, as did goldsmithing.

Apart from use as a pirate base, the islands are believed to have been uninhabited until a penal settlement was established during the British occupation of Java in the early seventeenth century. Archeological finds of Chinese ceramics on the seabed near the islands which date from around the 13th century suggest that the islands were once part of a trade route to Java. The settlement was abandoned by the Dutch during the Java War of 1825–1830, but the former convicts remained as settlers. Cotton plantations set up during the convict period became a major source of income, as did goldsmithing.

The islands were declared a national park in 1988

Geology and climate
The archipelago consists predominantly of pre-Tertiary continental islands primarily of quartzites and shales covered by basaltic lava. Geologically, the islands are part of Sundaland. The islands have extensive fringing and patchy coral reefs.

The best time to visit the islands is during the dry season, generally from April to October. The islands are influenced by the northwest monsoon during which winds from the west-northwest predominate and ocean currents are in an easterly direction. During the monsoon, rainfall averages 40 mm/day. During the southeast monsoon, dry winds from the east-southeast predominate and the ocean currents are in a westerly direction bringing water masses from the Flores Sea. Upwelled water masses during the southeast monsoon from the Flores and Banda Seas provides lower sea surface temperatures than during the northeast monsoon. The shallow slopes (5° to 15°) of the island shelves in the Java Sea (which rarely exceeds a depth of 55 m), provide environments for extensive reef development

Think of your ideal tropical paradise. Once you have that in mind, if it includes white-sand beaches fringed by palm trees, turquoise water so bright it stings your eyes, warm weather all year round, hardly any tourists and just enough decent accommodation to ensure you don’t have to pitch a tent then the islands of Karimunjawa are your paradise.

The main island is large for a remote outpost in the middle of the ocean, measuring about 25km long and 10km wide, with much of the southern section covered in jungle. Sandwiched between the jungle and the southern tip is the island’s main town called Karimunjawa. This is where the vast majority of visitors stay, although it is possible to stay in a floating hotel in the middle of the ocean and at a high-end resort on one of the far flung islands.

The main form of accommodation in Karimunjawa is the homestay, where you are set up in a room in a family’s house and can elect to either eat meals with them or purchase them yourself at one of the local warungs. The bathroom is shared in these homestays, of course, but all of them we inspected were clean and often reserved solely for guests, meaning you may be the only user of it anyway.

The main activities around these parts are snorkelling, diving and cruising around on a motorbike to explore the innumerable deserted white-sand beaches. Snorkelling is usually done by either arranging a boat through your guesthouse or heading down to the dock to find a local fisherman willing to take you out. The going rate is 300,000 rupiah for a five-hour boat ride to the outlying islands of your choice plus 30,000 rupiah per person for snorkelling gear. A variety of dive shops in town offer countless different options for diving on the nearby reefs. On our snorkelling trip we were a little disappointed by the coral bleaching which is underway across vast tracts of the reefs.

Because the main island is so large, a great way to explore is by motorbike, which costs 75,000 rupiah per day to hire — more than you’d pay on the mainland, but worth every single rupiah as the far flung areas of the island have some spectacular beaches. The road is paved all the way to the north of the island, but most of the beaches are down the end of dirt tracks which are signposted but still easy to miss.

Our favourite of these beaches is Tanjung Gelam, a mere five kilometres from Karimunjawa town. Around Pantai Barakuda is a turtle conservation centre where you can observe staff going about their chores such as scrubbing baby turtles in order to remove slime. It’s fascinating stuff.

How to get there:
Flights to Semarang are available from Jakarta, Denpasar Bali, and also from other cities. Karimunjawa itself has an airport in Kemujan Island, called the Dewadaru Airport. Small aircrafts land here although the flight schedule is still dominated by chartered flights from Semarang, Yogyakarta, or Bali.

Getting to Karimunjawa requires a ferry ride from the port town of Jepara, 2 hours by bus from Semarang.Ferries serve the islands three times a week, either from Jepara or also Semarang, and speed boats are plenty and available on special request.

Things to do:
- Diving and Snorkeling
The pristine ocean surrounding these areas is full of vibrant sea life and colorful corals. Courses are available for all levels of divers, and snorkeling equipment is readily available.

- Island Cruises
It’s not uncommon to spot dolphins on a cruise through this beautiful archipelago. Boat journeys can be arranged for groups or more intimate private occasions. Sunset cruises are particularly popular.

- Turtle Sanctuary
The islands were frequented by the area’s turtles, in the past, for use as a hatching ground. For a while, the turtles disappeared, but now some resorts in the area are working towards encouraging their return, providing sanctuaries where they can come to safely hatch their eggs.

Itinerary:
Day 1 – Depart with Slow Boat from Jepara Harbour Wednesday or Saturday
07:00 – 11:30 Slow Boat from Jepara Harbour to Karimunjawa Harbour
11:30 – 12:00 Transport from Karimunjawa Harbour to your Homestay, Hotel or Resort.
12:00 – 12:30 Welcome drink at your accommodation. During your drink you will receive verbal information about your tour package (in language of your choice: English, Indonesian or Javanese) and we will arrange the payment of your package.
12:30 – 13:30 Lunch at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
13:30 – 18:30 Use of motorbike to explore Karimunjawa and Kemujan (without guide). Including 1 litre petrol and map of the islands.
18:30 – 20:00 Dinner
20:00 – Free time

Day 2ith Fast Boat from Jepara Harbour
09:00 – 11:00 Fast Boat from Jepara Harbour to Karimunjawa Harbour
11:00 – 11:30 Transport from Karimunjawa Harbour to your Homestay, Hotel or Resort.
11:30 – 12:00 Welcome drink at your accommodation. During your drink you will receive verbal information about your tour package (in language of your choice: English, Indonesian or Javanese) and we will arrange the payment of your package.
12:00 – 13:30 Lunch at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
13:30 – 18:30 Use of motorbike to explore Karimunjawa and Kemujan (without guide). Including 1 litre petrol and map of the islands.
18:30 – 20:00 Dinner 20:00 – Free time

Day 2: Island Hoping and Snorkeling
07:30 – 08:00 Breakfast at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
08:00 – 08:30 Transport from your Homestay, Hotel or Resort to Harbour
08:30 – 17:30 Full day Island Hopping and Snorkeling (Snorkeling at Menjangan Kecil or Takak Cendok, Lunch at Geleang Island or Cemara Kecil Island, Snorkeling at Gosong Cemara or Alang-Alang Coral, Sunset at Tanjung Gelam Beach)
17:30 – 18:00 Transport from Harbour to your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
18:00 – 20:00 Dinner 20:00 – Free time

Day 3: Island Hoping and Snorkeling
07:30 – 08:00 Breakfast at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
08:00 – 08:30 Transport from your Homestay, Hotel or Resort to Harbour
08:30 – 17:30 Full day Island Hopping and Snorkeling (Visit Gosong Sloka (by low water), Snorkeling at Cilik Island, Lunch at Tengah Island, Snorkeling at Sintok Island, Visit sharkpool at Mejangan Besar Island)
17:30 – 18:00 Transport from Harbour to your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
18:00 – 20:00 Dinner 20:00 – Free time

Day 4: Island Hoping and Tours
08:00 – 09:00 Breakfast at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
09:00 – 18:00 Full day Karimunjawa and Kemujan Overland Tour (Mangrove Trekking, Visit traditional houses of Jawa and Bugis, Lunch, Batu Lawang Trekking, Sunset at Joko Tuo View Point)
18:00 – 20:00 Dinner
20:00 – Free time

Day 5: Karimunjawa-Jepara or Semarang
Back with Fast Boat from Karimunjawa Harbour Saturday, Sunday or Wednesday
08:00 – 08:30 Breakfast at your Homestay, Hotel or Resort
08:30 – 09:00 Transport from your Homestay, Hotel or Resort to Karimunjawa Harbour
09:00 – 11:00 Fast Boat from Karimunjawa Harbour to Jepara Harbour

End of services


Rate : USD 550/person/twin share, minimum 2 person

Included :
- Entrance tickets to attraction sites
- Entrance tickets to National Parks
- Meals as indicated above in the itinerary
- Beverage and alcohols ARE NOT included.
- Transportation with private air conditioned car (transfer in/out from/to the meeting point)
- Accommodation as indicated in the itinerary
- English speaking guide
- Mineral water and snacks or fruits during hiking days
- Snorkeling gears (life vest, goggles, snorkel, fins)
- Private boat

Not included :
- Personal expenses (alcoholic beverages, souvenirs) Tip for guide and porters Items that are not mentioned in “included” Airport tax Equipments that should be prepared: - Gears - Comfortable backpack with rain cover (25 to 30 liters) - Sun glasses - Cap/hat - Scarf - Sun screen, or any other thing that will protect you from getting sun burnt - Swim suit - Rash guard - Dry bag - A pair of flip flops or water shoes - Mosquito repellant